Sunday, 4 February 2018

Component Moment

Video games may have their flashy graphics and automatic maths but one thing they don't have is chunky wooden pieces and lots of lovely, lovely cardboard.

A games components are a big part of the tactile experience board gaming brings and one of the many things I enjoy about gaming. This week Kelly and I discuss our favourite types of components in games, discuss the age old debate of mini vs standee and discuss if component upgrades in games/ deluxe versions are worth it. 


We also discuss some of the games we have been playing this week including Ra, Schotten Totten, fridge Carcassonne and Tiny Epic Quest.

Keep up with us the rest of the week by following us on twitter and for more great podcasts check out insidevoicesnetwork.com

3 comments:

  1. "Bits" are definitely one of the two huge advantages that boardgames have over video games for me - that, and playing with people you can actually see. And I'm definitely a metal coin fan; last July I backed the "Swords and Sails Coins" kickstarter, and I've never played the game, but I do now have a large bag of Byzantine-style coins for use in any game that needs them.

    The tokens in the reprint edition of Splendor aren't as heavy as the originals. Shame! The ones in Lovecraft Letter are pretty solid, though.

    I'm also not a minis fan: I'm a terrible painter, and like many boardgamers I have a storage space problem. The only pre-painted minis I have are the X-Wing ships, and those are pretty well done but not cheap.

    I think I may have said before, I design and 3d-print and sell my own component enhancements - https://3d.firedrake.org/ . Those are light plastic (largely hollow, in fact) but they can still improve the gameplay experience. Box inserts are more expensive to make, but still cheaper than buying one in laser-cut wood…

    You can download Catan terrain tiles and other accessories from Thingiverse, and then get them 3d-printed (if you know someone who has a printer, or via a service like 3dhubs). Meeplesource and boardgameextras sell a variety of generic upgraded components, too.

    I definitely like to have the option of buying a game cheaply, and then upgrading individual bits if I really like it.

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    Replies
    1. Ooo I didn't realise you printed and sold components! I'll check it out. My brother has a 3d printer but little interest in board games unfortunately so its difficult to get him to print things for me!

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